About Us

We deliver sustainable solutions to South Florida gardens and landscapes.

Who We Are

Water Wise Landscape Solutions was founded by South Florida natives, avid gardeners and sportsmen with a genuine care for our local environment, particularly the quality of water that we drink and enjoy recreationally. Gardening and regenerative agriculture were hobbies of ours until we realized the incredible results and lower maintenance achieved by creating systems and working with nature rather than against it.

 

We leverage our backgrounds in building construction, software and graphic design to bring these successful systems to a broader audience, for the greater good of our local community and environment for years to come.

 

Water Wise founder Toby Lawrence and his son with their high yield of fruit

What We Do

 

Save Water. Save Money.

We determine the minimum effective doses of water, fertilizer and maintenance that each individual landscape needs to achieve the desired aesthetics with the least amount of inputs. Our three main services – landscape design, irrigation and bio-fertilizer (link to individual pages) – all tie together to achieve the end goals of minimizing excessive water use and decreasing pollution while still delivering the landscape of your dreams. This can have a profound impact on our precious aquifers (where we get our drinking water), our numerous bodies of water (that we enjoy recreationally), our local wildlife (birds, butterflies!), and ultimately our water bills.

Qualifications

  • State certified Irrigation contractor (#SCC131152340)

  • Florida Water Star Accredited Landscape Professional

  • Florida Water Star Accredited Irrigation Professional

  • Permaculture Design Certificate

Florida Water AP logo

How We Got Here

 

Initially, we started harvesting rainwater after observing how effective it was on our fruit and vegetable yields (link to blog post). South Florida gets A LOT of water. The old way of handling excess rain was to push it out into the streets where it picks up oils and other pollutants before entering the storm drains where it is either dumped into our waterways or sent to water treatment facilities for processing. Waterways quickly become polluted and water treatment facilities become overwhelmed. This seemed a little archaic and inefficient to us.
We learned how to keep this valuable resource on our property by diverting it to trees to increase shade and food production (avocados, mangos) in our landscapes. Permaculture principles state that the problem is the solution. Moving water around – from a problem (too much water or misplaced gutter downspouts creating flooding problems) to a solution (increased shade, and food; decreased stormwater runoff and flooding). This was effective, but our clients wanted more.

We then began to understand our clients’ pain point – skyrocketing water bills!

While we get a lot of calls for people who would like to use rainwater for their entire landscape, it is just not feasible short of installing a massive thousand-gallon cistern on the property. Our experience with rainwater harvesting allowed us to experiment with a lot of tools and tricks to deliver water more efficiently. This allowed us to further expand into turfgrass and planting areas.

As turfgrass is the primary consumer of inputs – water, fertilizer and maintenance – minimizing or replacing it with plants that are naturally adapted to survive and thrive only on rainfall allowed us to cut down the amount of water required in the overall landscape. Now we were really making progress! Water bills were dropping by 25, 50 and 75% by switching from high-volume spray heads to low volume micro-irrigation heads. We were even able to completely by-pass irrigation zones once the new plants became established. By all means, keep a small section of turfgrass on your property. However, if yourself, your dogs or your kids don’t roll around in it, you don’t really need it.

Water bills were dropping and landscapes were popping. Butterflies were starting to come around more often and clients were beginning to use their outdoor areas more often given the increase in shade around the property. However, we felt something was still missing.Plants need water, but they also need food. We were never satisfied with the results of chemical applications on our yard. The grass seemed to look ok but one problem (insect or disease) seemed to be happening throughout the year. Thinking back to our organic gardening roots – feed the soil, not the plant – we wanted to see how we could expand this concept outside of our raised beds and into all areas of the landscape. We found bio-fertilizer – adding microbiology and life to the soil – to be the answer. Creating a sponge out of our sandy soils helped to increase its water-holding capacity, ultimately allowing us to use less water.

The trifecta of effective landscape design, sensible watering practices and transforming our sandy soils into sponges using bio-fertilizer applications can have a profound impact on decreasing water overuse and cutting down on maintenance.
We strive to deliver products and services that are safe to use without potentially harmful side effects to the environment, yourself, your family or your pets. We hope that our conservative and sustainable approach to landscape design, irrigation, and fertilization becomes the standard and not the exception.

If you are fed up with your water bill every month or you would just like to implement more sustainable landscape practices at your home, we can help. Call us today to set up and appointment.

What our customers have to say

“Water Wise provided the professional installation of two rain barrels at my home.  I now have a clean, easy to use rainwater system that my herbs and vegetables clearly love – it’s a noticeable difference from the tap water I was using.  I have even started composting!”

Donna L.

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

“What was once a gutter downspout that caused flooding and eroded my home’s foundation Is now a readily available source of water for my vegetable garden. The overflow even feeds my mango tree, which is dripping with fruit!”

Matt S.

Oakland Park, Florida